Jason Schiffman, Ph.D.

Dr. Jason Schiffman earned a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Southern California in 2003. He is Professor and Director of Clinical Training within the Department of Psychological Science, University of California, Irvine. Dr. Schiffman previously founded and developed two clinical, research, and training programs serving people at clinical high-risk for psychosis. He has published around 200 scientific articles and procured $10M in grants with agencies such as the National Institute of Mental Health for work on risk for psychosis and psychosis risk, the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression for research attempting to improve early identification methods, the Mental Health Foundation embarking on anti-stigma efforts, the State of Hawaii Departments of Education and Health for clinical services h to youth receiving public mental health services, Maryland’s Behavioral Health Administration for assessment and intervention services for youth and young adults at risk for psychosis, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration for the establishment of a model community mental health specialty clinic for those at risk for psychosis, and the Orange County Health Care agency to establish a risk-assessment and consultation resource center. Dr. Schiffman currently trains specialty clinics across the country in his psychosocial intervention model for those at risk for psychosis, as well as in the administration of the Structured Interview for Psychosis Risk Syndromes (SIPS), the gold standard interview for detecting risk for psychosis. Dr. Schiffman is one of only three certified trainers of the SIPS in the US. His psychosis research refines the identification process of people at risk, elucidates the effects of psychosocial interventions, uncovers mechanisms reducing stigma, and attempts to address health inequities.

Contact Dr. Schiffman directly at [email protected] if you would like to consult with him.

 

View Curriculum Vitae
Friday, July 26, 2024 at 4:00 PM - 7:15 PM UTC
Jason Schiffman, Ph.D.
$69.00

“I was very impressed. The presentation was clear, informative and definitely added to my knowledge base.”-Mary H., Psychologist, New Jersey

Psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia are considered to be among the most debilitating and distressing mental health conditions. Despite impacting approximately 3% of the population, many clinicians lack the training and resources to recognize and best work with this vulnerable group of people, leaving many with psychosis isolated, stigmatized, and without help. Nonetheless, growing evidence suggests that, with tailored early intervention, many people with psychosis can recover from illness and lead a life of their choosing in the community. This seminar will familiarize you with psychosis, emphasizing the early phases of illness. It will then demonstrate strategies for reducing stigma, increasing empathy, and facilitating early identification. I will share screening tools and briefly touch on treatment strategies, as well as provide clinical resources for comprehensive specialty care.

Psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia are considered to be among the most debilitating and distressing mental health conditions. Despite impacting approximately 3% of the population, many clinicians lack the training and resources to recognize and best work with this vulnerable group of people, leaving many with psychosis isolated, stigmatized, and without help. Nonetheless, growing evidence suggests that, with tailored early intervention, many people with psychosis can recover from illness and lead a life of their choosing in the community. This seminar will familiarize you with psychosis, emphasizing the early phases of illness. It will then demonstrate strategies for reducing stigma, increasing empathy, and facilitating early identification. I will share screening tools and briefly touch on treatment strategies, as well as provide clinical resources for comprehensive specialty care.

session: 11348

“I was very impressed. The presentation was clear, informative and definitely added to my knowledge base.”-Mary H., Psychologist, New Jersey

Psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia are considered to be among the most debilitating and distressing mental health conditions. Despite impacting approximately 3% of the population, many clinicians lack the training and resources to recognize and best work with this vulnerable group of people, leaving many with psychosis isolated, stigmatized, and without help. Nonetheless, growing evidence suggests that, with tailored early intervention, many people with psychosis can recover from illness and lead a life of their choosing in the community. This seminar will familiarize you with psychosis, emphasizing the early phases of illness. It will then demonstrate strategies for reducing stigma, increasing empathy, and facilitating early identification. I will share screening tools and briefly touch on treatment strategies, as well as provide clinical resources for comprehensive specialty care.

Psychotic disorders such as schizophrenia are considered to be among the most debilitating and distressing mental health conditions. Despite impacting approximately 3% of the population, many clinicians lack the training and resources to recognize and best work with this vulnerable group of people, leaving many with psychosis isolated, stigmatized, and without help. Nonetheless, growing evidence suggests that, with tailored early intervention, many people with psychosis can recover from illness and lead a life of their choosing in the community. This seminar will familiarize you with psychosis, emphasizing the early phases of illness. It will then demonstrate strategies for reducing stigma, increasing empathy, and facilitating early identification. I will share screening tools and briefly touch on treatment strategies, as well as provide clinical resources for comprehensive specialty care.

session: 7247